Polish Diplomatic Documents 1919 January-May

Polish Diplomatic Documents 1919 January-May

The most recent volume (twenty-third) of the Polish Diplomatic Documents series contains 430 documents illustrating the activities of Polish politicians and diplomats between January and May 1919.

Special attention was paid to Paris Peace Conference deliberations, including political and organizational issues. The Polish state actively solicited input for the peace treaty, and also tried to obtain material, economic and humanitarian aid. The creation of the Polish Delegation to the Peace Conference has been heavily documented, as well as negotiations of the Polish National Committee with delegates of Warsaw authorities staying in Paris.

The volume also contains documents illustrating the actions of Polish diplomacy in the Eastern part of the continent, regarding the ongoing armed conflict. Besides fighting for Eastern Galicia and Cieszyn Silesia, it also shows the situation of the Polish Army in Russia and issues related to the onset of the Polish-Bolshevik war. Many documents also relate to humanitarian issues and aid granted to Polish prisoners of war and refugees.

Among the published documents, materials were also included about the Greater Poland Uprising and issues faced when transporting the Haller Army from France to Poland.

The volume also documented the rebirth process of the Polish Foreign Service, which was associated with constructing a network of diplomatic and consular sites.

The source of the volume largely consists of materials stored in the Archives of Modern Records in Warsaw and the Jozef Pilsudski Institute of America. Interesting supplementary documentation has been included from the Central Military Archive, Polish Institute and General Sikorski Museum in London. The publication also contains material available in the Academic Library of the Polish Academy of Learning and the Polish Academy of Sciences in Krakow, as well as The National Archives in London. The volume also includes material published in the “Polish Monitor” in 1919, as well as transcripts from Legislative Sejm meetings. Document from Russian archives were also utilized. The vast majority of materials presented in this volume consist of previously unpublished documents.

The volume also contains an index of names and an extensive subject index, the preface contains detailed information about the structure and functioning of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Polish National Committee, as well as the organization of the Polish Delegation to the Peace Conference.

Polskie Dokumenty Dyplomatyczne 1933

Polskie Dokumenty Dyplomatyczne 1933

This 22nd volume in the series Polish Diplomatic Documents contains 384 archival documents on Polish foreign policy in 1933.

Many documents in the volume are devoted to Polish-German relations, which evolved substantially after chancellor Hitler’s rise to power, with the situation in the Free City of Danzig (the replacement of the High Commissioner of the League of Nations in Gdansk and the strengthening of the Polish military contingent in Westerplatte) also exerting a significant impact on relations between the two countries.
A considerable part of the published material illustrates the activities of Polish diplomacy with respect to the so-called Four-Power Pact, portraying a critical stance of the Polish authorities towards this initiative. A lot of attention is also paid to multilateral activities of Polish diplomacy connected with debates within League of Nations and the actions of the International Conference on Disarmament.
The documents published in the volume come from the Central Archives of Modern Records  in Warsaw, the Polish Institute and Sikorski Museum in London, the Józef Piłsudski Institute of America, and the Hoover Institution (available on microfilm from the Central Archives of Modern Records). Documents from Central Military Archive, the State Archive in Gdańsk and the Polish Institute of Arts and Sciences of America constitute an interesting complement to the volume.
The publication also includes a name index and an extended subject index, with the preface providing information about the structure and staff of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The documents are published in chronological order.

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Polskie Dokumenty Dyplomatyczne 1933
Editor: Wojciech Skóra, cooperation: Piotr Długołęcki
Warszawa 2015
ISBN: 978-83-64895-49-4
pages: LXVI + 899

Polskie Dokumenty Dyplomatyczne 1979

Polskie Dokumenty Dyplomatyczne 1979

Editors: Piotr Długołęcki, Jerzy Kochanowski
Warszawa 2014
ISBN 978-83-62453-73-3
pages: LII + 1005

This 20th volume in the series Polish Diplomatic Documents contains 352 documents presenting Polish foreign policy in 1979.

The event that dominated the Polish diplomatic activities in the first half of the year was the pilgrimage of Pope John Paul II to Poland and its international and domestic consequences.

In relations with Western countries, increased importance was given to human rights and the primacy of economic issues. The most important bilateral visits included Edward Gierek to France and Minister Emil Wojtaszek to the U.S. and Germany. Among politicians visiting Warsaw in 1979 should be mentioned the German and Austrian chancellors and Edmund Muskie, a  prominent U.S. senator.

In relations with the Soviet Union and other socialist countries, Gierek’s visit to Moscow, Berlin and Sofia and attempts undertaken by the Soviet Union to coordinate multilateral policy (mainly issues of disarmament, the situation in the Middle East and the Chinese-Vietnamese conflict) are notable.

The Polish diplomatic service also devoted much attention to celebrations of the 35th  anniversary of socialist Poland and 40th anniversary of the outbreak of War World II. An element of internal politics that affected the international image of Poland included the activity of the domestic democratic opposition.

The year was ended by the Soviet intervention in Afghanistan

The sources in the volume come mainly from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the communist party’s Central Committee, and they are interestingly supplemented with documents created by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and the Cabinet Office. The bulk of the materials are classified, and previously unpublished. The volume has a name index and an extended subject index, with information about the MFA’s organisational structure.

Polskie Dokumenty Dyplomatyczne 1941

Polskie Dokumenty Dyplomatyczne 1941

Polskie Dokumenty Dyplomatyczne 1941 [Polish Diplomatic Documents 1941]
Volume Editor: Jacek Tebinka
Warszawa 2013
ISBN 978-83-62453-67-2
976 + LXIV pp.

The nineteenth volume in the publishing series Polish Diplomatic Documents covers the diplomatic service’s activities in 1941.
The Polish foreign policy of the time was hugely influenced by the changing international developments. Following Germany’s  attack of the USSR on 22 June and the US entry into the war (in response to the Japanese assault on 7 December), an anti-Nazi coalition came into being, leading many to refer to 1941 as a year of breakthrough in the war effort.
The most important event for Poland (affecting the domestic affairs, too) was the so-called Sikorski-Mayski treaty, resulting in a normalisation of  relations with the Kremlin and formation of the Polish Army on Soviet territory.
The Polish authorities sought to keep as high profile as possible in relations with the Allies, with as many as possible diplomatic and consular posts. The biggest priority for Polish missions at the time was to bring relief to Polish refugees (whatever their ethnicity), who could be found not only Europe but also in faraway places such as Australia, Japan and Latin America.
The Polish diplomatic service also took measures seeking to organise relief for Poles staying at home, in occupied Poland; and another major line was an informational campaign to draw the attention of the international public opinion to the conduct of the occupying forces.
Much effort was devoted to reach the Allies and the world public opinion with the message that the Polish state must be restored, and a programme was presented of expanding Polish territory at Germany’s expense.
The volume presents materials kept at the Polish Institute and Sikorski Museum in London, and the Central Archives of Modern Records (AAN) in Warsaw (primarily, a microfilmed Hoover Institute, Stanford, collection available at AAN). Other content comes from the Józef Piłsudski Institute of America and the Polish Institute of Arts and Sciences of America, both in New York, and also from the UK’s National Archives in Kew.
The 407 documents in the volume, presented in chronological order, come with a preface, brief summaries of each document, a list of acronyms used, an annex presenting changes in the structure of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and indexes (by name and by subject).

Polskie Dokumenty Dyplomatyczne 1937

Polskie Dokumenty Dyplomatyczne 1937

Editor: Jan Stanisław Ciechanowski, in cooperation with: Piotr Długołęcki
Publisher: Polski Instytut Spraw Międzynarodowych
ISBN 978-83-62453-45-0
Warsaw 2012, pages: LIV + 840
Languages: Polish, English, French, German

The eighteenth volume in the series Polish Diplomatic Documents contains 309 documents portraying Polish foreign policy in 1937.
The basis of the volume are the materials collected in the Archives of Modern Records in Warsaw, the Polish Institute and Sikorski Museum in London and the Jozef Pilsudski Institute in America.
The most important question in the history of Polish diplomacy in 1937 was the issue of the Free City of Danzig, understood to be both part of international relations (via the League of Nations) as an issue affecting the shape of Polish-German relations as well as a component of Polish minority policy (the reactions of the local authorities to the Polish minority in Danzig).
In the international area, Polish efforts were concentrated on safeguarding the interests of the Republic of Poland in negotiations of the Western Pact (ultimately, unsuccessful) and the international context of the Spanish Civil War.
The most important event in bilateral relations that year should be considered the Polish-German Joint Declaration of Minorities of 5 November, accompanied by Hitler’s assurances of the inviolability of Polish rights in the Free City.
Besides the documents and introduction the volume also includes indexes by subject and by person. Documents published in the volume are arranged in chronological order.